Self-management of mental health problems in young people

 
00:00
Presentation First Author: 
Dorien Nieman
Abstract: 

Findings from epidemiological studies show that 75% of major psychiatric disorders emerge before the age of 24. Moreover, the health burden, as expressed in years lost due to disability, is larger during the period between 15 and 24 years, than during any other phase of life.

Transitional changes in the adolescent brain may explain part of the increased vulnerability during this period. Dynamic processes like pruning and myelination take place during adolescence and young people are particularly sensitive for immediate reward, whereas impulse control is then still incomplete. In addition, young people are less likely to ask for help when facing mental health problems, which is hampered by the traditional divide between Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services and Adult mental Health Services at the age of 18. New, youth friendly services, technologies and interventions are needed to help young people deal with the psychological distress they are facing and prevent the emergence of major psychiatric illness. In The Netherlands and Belgium there is an increasing awareness of continuity of care around the age of 18, and youth mental health care programs are starting to be developed. Moreover our own imaging and intervention studies focus particularly at the vulnerable period between the ages15-24 years. In this presentation an overview will be given on Youth Mental Health care initiatives in The Netherlands and Belgium. In addition, results will be presented of our work on self management techniques and neurobiological correlates of youth at increased risk for mental illness. Findings from epidemiological studies show that 75% of major psychiatric disorders emerge before the age of 24. Moreover, the health burden, as expressed in years lost due to disability, is larger during the period between 15 and 24 years, than during any other phase of life.

Conference Name: 
Date of Presentation: 
9th Oct 2015
Type of presentation: 
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