Immigrants' outcome after a first episode psychosis: Any difference from non-immigrants?

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Objectives: Immigration is a well-known risk factor for the development of psychosis, but the literature looking at outcomes in youth with first episode psychosis is scarce and heterogeneous. The aim of this study is to compare first and second-generation immigrants and non-immigrants’ treatment engagement as well as symptomatic and functional outcomes 2 years after admission to a First Episode Psychosis Early Intervention Service.Methods: This longitudinal prospective study of 223 subjects entering First Episode Psychosis Services in Montréal, Canada compared retention into treatment and symptomatic and functional outcomes of first and second-generation immigrants and non-immigrants. Data collection at admission, after one year and 2 years included immigration status, other sociodemographic characteristics, adherence to medication, symptoms, social and occupational functioning, and attrition rate. Results: Immigrants and non-immigrants entering the services had similar symptoms and functioning profile. First-generation immigrants present less substance use disorder and are more likely to study at 12 and 24 months. Second-generation immigrants were more likely to be living with their parents throughout the study. Importantly, immigrants were about 3 times more likely to be lost to the 2-year follow up compared to non-immigrants even when controlling for potential confounding factors. Differences were found between first and second-generation immigrants in terms of substance use and occupational outcome. Conclusions: Young immigrants are more likely to quit treatment than non-immigrants 2 years after a first episode psychosis but once engaged in first episode psychosis services, immigrants’ outcome seems to be similar to non-immigrants.

Poster First Author: 
Amal Abdel-Baki
Additional Authors: 
Sofia Medrano
Conference Presented At: 
IAYMH 2015
Poster Date: 
October, 2015
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